Birds recognize the receiver and the tower as a solid object, so they are unlikely to fly into it. Only when multiple reflections are not focused on the tower but instead focused in a concentrated area of clear space, there is a risk that birds will fly through that space. However, by focusing no more than four suns at any one standby point in the sky, the level of solar flux is safer for birds. Birds can fly in and out of this zone without injury,” said Smith. Of course, birds can and do fly into most manmade structures cell phone towers, houses, skyscrapers, industrial buildings, and coal plants and natural gas plants so the risk of flying into the tower itself cant be eliminated. When Heliostats Are Put in Standby Like computers, the heliostats are asleep at night just laying flat to avoid wind.
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Solar power may be coming to Bend in a big way | News – Home

“We want to get as much as we can from renewable energy sources, because if we don’t, then we’re going to be generally be looking at fossil fuels, either coal or natural gas,” said Mike Riley, executive director at the Environmental Center in Bend. Riley said he was not familiar enough with the specific project to comment on it, but spoke instead of renewable energy in general. “We’re energy-constrained,” Israel said. “We have to start phasing out coal-fired plants. Not only do we need more capacity, but we’re retiring old capacity. So it’s time that we bring on new technologies of the future.” Bottom line: Even solar energy comes with a price.
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